We expect President Trump’s honest stance on Armenian Genocide – Aram Hamparian

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Armenians in the United States are still waiting to see whether President Donald Trump will use the language of facts in his April 24 Genocide address or yield to Turkey’s pressure and avoid calling things by their names, says Aram Hamparian, the executive director of the Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA).
In an interview with Tert.am, Hamparian expressed hope that the new president will nonetheless opt for rely historical facts and moral values to demonstrate respect for the victims of the Armenian Genocide.

Meantime he admitted that the Turkey’s pressure on the United States has been always decisive.

Commenting on Trump’s policy line, Hamparian said they are now trying to make out how the administration works and whether the decision-making is in the hands of the president or the Department of State.

“We still need to figure out how the geopolitical, foreign policy and other decisions are being made,” he added.

Asked to evaluate the administration’s work with the Armenian lobby, Hamparian said that the ANCA normally maintains contact with Congress members and the elected president. “It is our obligation. In any decision-making process, we try to make out the ways of being helpful to Armenia. This is why we collaborate with all. Should the Congress or Senate members have a desire to offer their assistance to Armenia and to recognize the Armenian Genocide, we will collaborate with them,” he said.

Hamparian noted that in the past, the Turkish government maintained better relations with those who could have prevented the recognition of the Armenian Genocide.

“But they do not have those relations now. Also, what is going on in the Middle East today is very much like the Armenian Genocide, and I believe that many Americans do really see it. It is also important to live up to the promise of keeping the Armenian Genocide issue under the United States’ spotlight. And the day will finally arrive when Turkey will no longer be able to influence the US politics,” he said.

The Committee is trying, in every possible way, to push ahead with Armenian issues in the US Congress, its only expectation from President Trump being the efforts to silence Turkey’s denial and to adopt an honest stance on the issue, Hamparian said, noting that four states in the country have already recognized the Armenian Genocide.

Barrack Obama, who was Trump’s predecessor in office, promised during his 2008 campaign to recognize the Armenian Genocide if elected a president. But over the course of his eight years in office, he never used “genocide” in his annual April 24 addresses. Instead, he opted for the Armenian wording, Medz Yeghern (great massacres) which didn’t give the right legal definition to the atrocities committed the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire.

As opposed to Obama, Trump never addressed Armenian issues during his campaign and never gave any promise to acknowledge the Genocide.

Eighty members of Congress recently issued a call on the new US president, urging him to recognize the big tragedy. Their written address was undersigned also by House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce and Ranking Member Frank Engel.